#TEDLesson – Appollo Robbins: The art of misdirection

Talk summary:

Hailed as the greatest pickpocket in the world, Apollo Robbins studies the quirks of human behavior as he steals your watch. In a hilarious demonstration, Robbins samples the buffet of the TEDGlobal 2013 audience, showing how the flaws in our perception make it possible to swipe a wallet and leave it . . . → Read More: #TEDLesson – Appollo Robbins: The art of misdirection

How to Improve Your English Accent

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A New Approach to the Perfect Accent: The Rules of Romancing a Language

Want to perfect your English accent?

Consider dating it.

It may sound silly, but approaching a new foreign language using the same “dating” process you would when meeting a new love interest has proven successful for those looking to learn.

Think about what you would do upon . . . → Read More: How to Improve Your English Accent

Evaluating the impact of our written words

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Do you re-read your business emails?

Do you get a colleague to run through a draft report you’ve written?

As the CEO of a professional English editing company, I’ve built my business on the premise that what we write has a huge impact on our personal or company brand image. What we say evaporates into the ether, but . . . → Read More: Evaluating the impact of our written words

#TEDLesson – Yang Lan: The generation that’s remaking China

Youtube Screencap

 

Talk Summary:

Yang Lan, a journalist and entrepreneur who’s been called “the Oprah of China,” offers insight into the next generation of young Chinese citizens — urban, connected (via microblogs) and alert to injustice. The chair of a multiplatform business empire, Yang is pioneering more-open means of communication in the communist nation.

Click here to view the official TED . . . → Read More: #TEDLesson – Yang Lan: The generation that’s remaking China

One – Singularly Confusing

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Numbers… I hear your groan!

Often hard to learn in another language.

I mean, look at the French, for 92 they say ‘four twenties twelve’ (quatre-vingt douze) whereas the Chinese confuse us by grouping tens of thousands together which makes 25,000 ‘two ten thousands five thousand’ (两万五千 – liang wan wu qian). However, when the French or Chinese . . . → Read More: One – Singularly Confusing

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